Peacock Congee

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Peacock Congee

There's a difference between congee and porridge; one is made from oat, the other from rice. Because rice is considered a "neutral grain" in Chinese medicine, congee makes an amazing base that can metabolically rev you or cool you down depending on what you add to it. There are a bajillion reasons why to eat, but here are just a few...

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Chinese Tea Eggs

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Chinese Tea Eggs

Old school Chinese fast food is simply vintage goodness! A hard-boiled egg is one of nature’s perfect foods – portable, nutritious, satisfying. Solo it's boring. Infuse it with a bit of tea, soy sauce, and anything you'd put in a pumpkin pie - and suddenly it's breakfast magic! 

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Chilled Summer Avocado Soup

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Chilled Summer Avocado Soup

In the heat of the afternoon, no doubt the LAST think you're craving is a piping hot bowl of broth fresh off the stove. However, a creamy cup of chilled avocado soup is the PERFECT lazy summer lunch - it has omegas, protein, collagen, potassium, fiber, and is ridiculously refreshing. We found this to be our FAVORITE summer soup recipe yet!

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The Magic of Golden Milk

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The Magic of Golden Milk

The current research on turmeric as kitchen cabinet medicine is backing up what herbalists have known for generations - it stops pain, is anti-inflammatory, promotes digestive health, detoxifies the liver, and boosts the immune system. Easiest way to get more of it? Golden Turmeric Milk! 

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Black Pepper and Pomegranate Juice Mélange

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Black Pepper and Pomegranate Juice Mélange

One of our "ancient Chinese secrets" in Asian Medicine is that black pepper happens to be an incredibly powerful medicinal masquerading as steak seasoning.  It's a classic example of the pantry as medicine cabinet. Yogi Bhajan's recipe for black pepper and pomegranate "tea" is a fantastic example of silk road medicine to keep the cold & flu at bay!

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Soup to Break a Sweat

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Soup to Break a Sweat

One of the first questions I ask patients with the cold or flu is "have you broken a sweat?" Whenever we find ourselves fighting a serious pathogen, our body reacts by raising its internal temperature in an effort to burn out the invader. The breaking of a fever is an indicator that the fight is over. The sooner the fever comes, the quicker the pathogen is killed, and closer we are to recovery.  Here's my regular recipe for recovery soup!

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